Tag Archives: alternative

August on the roof

We decided to fix our kitchen roof this month. It was done about fifteen years ago with planks of waney edged board from our sawmill. We have started to experience rain on the breadboard so it was about time. Now the sawmill is happily churning out wood again we can continue the essential repairs.

First we took everything out of the kitchen. Which made it a challenge for those residents on domestic (day of cooking, cleaning, wood sawing duty). Some of us carried boards up the hill and baton. Some prised old board off the roof, and we took it in turns having the children. We put a layer of canvas down once all the old roof boards were off and swept all the cobwebs off he beams. Then we fixed the baton running down the beams to attach the new boards to. Getting the boards straight was not easy at the building is shall we say rustic and has slumped in places since it was built. Still sturdy though.

We also now benefit from a skylight above the rayburn in the kitchen which is truly life changing. When cooking you can now see what you are stirring. Good…or bad, depends i suppose.

IMG_0920 IMG_0923 IMG_0936

Raising the siege towers

IMG_0975

Rosie the cob mistress at work. She led volunteers in touching up the roundhouse walls (our communal living area) and re liming them. It looks very shiny, and just in time for the open day in September. She also took on the liming of the new guesthouse walls which are dazzling.

IMG_0982

Carnage in the roundhouse as walls are patched up and repaired.

IMG_0926

As promised a photograph of Ed and his Harris hawk Maya. He has been taking her out and training her and she is learning fast. She was unfortunately kept in a dark shed for many years without flying and so he is having to start from scratch really. Pardon the pun. First he flew her short distances on the rope, enticing her with meat, and then gradually longer and longer distances. Now she flies above while Ed walks down to the orchards to train her.

2015-08-18 11.18.44

Sometimes harrowing is. Harrowing, that is. But not this time. Charlie working hard with Sophia, Jake and Pedro.

We are clearing a bit of land that has been occasional pasture with a number of apple trees on it. It has been garden before and is right next to the poly tunnels so it makes sense to turn it in to garden again. We want to have enough space to grow oats and wheat. We are going to have to trim the russets a little though.

In the gardens… we have been busy sowing over wintering vegetables and salads. We are back to having to consume ten leeks a day. Green manures like crimson clover have been sown. The first succession of winter salads are getting there. Us gardeners have discussed ways of trying to thwart the hungry gap by over wintering things in the poly tunnels and sowing things very early. Will let you know how that plan works out in May and June next year!

My daughter has been snipping caterpillars in half, which is very useful but slightly disturbing that shes killing things already ( aged two and a half)! Those foul smelling cabbage whites. The children have been devouring wineberries, blackberries, plums and apples but also helping to make cakes and crumbles.

IMG_0993

Tinkers Bubble had a stall at the Ham Hill Woodland Fair last Saturday. Ham hill is the high hill we live on and is also a country park. It has a vivid history, having been quarried since the roman times, home to an iron age hill fort and medieval village.

We had a stall and did some horse logging and crosscut sawing demos. They also had chainsawing there, kids crafts, meat, sweets and some interesting wood carvers including traditional bow makers. We sold some juice, discovery apples, cake and vinegar.

Our Open Day is on the 19th of September. If you are local come along! I promise there will be cake.

Advertisements

Hay making in the hungry gap

We made our first hay in mid June just before we all went off to the Green Scythe Fair. More about that later.

Hay making involves an early start (5am) to beat the heat and to make it easier to cut the grass as it is still damp in the early morning. It is beautiful to be in the meadow at this time in the morning as the sun climbs higher in the sky while you work. We cut all our hay by hand with scythes. As you cut a swathe through the grass you leave a row of cut grass on your left. The hay is left to dry until afternoon, then turned. In the evening we come down and pile it into long rows to stop it from getting too damp in the night and the next morning we are down to spread it out to dry, turning it when needed until it is dry enough to store.

IMG_0619

IMG_0677
Our horse Charlie carting hay with Ed and John

This meadow alone is not enough to feed our animals through the winter and we will have to cut more hay. We have more mouths to feed now with the two calves, and Jerseys are a bit more high maintenance than the hardy Dexters. Our hay meadow was looking in a lot better shape this year compared to last year though which I was really pleased about. Most of the field isn’t grazed because the animals would damage the young apple trees. This means it has the potential to get very weedy, with a lot of nettles, docks and a few brambles creeping in. With regular scything of the weeds at the right time we have managed to control them a lot better this year.

Tinkers Bubble again had a stall at the Scythe Fair, a one day festival near Langport, Somerset. Both horses were used to take things to the site, as some of us are involved in setting up the festival. Jim took Pedro the 10 miles pulling a cart full of tools, electric fence, tent and bicycle. Once there he was able to help cart things about, much more sensible than a landrover for going back and forth across a field.

We sold our apple juice, cakes, plants, baskets and hand carved bowls, spoons and jewellery. We also have info boards with photos of our land and talk to people about why we live on the land and what we are doing. It is great to have feedback from local people about our place in the community.

IMG_0668

The communual garden is full of a variety of things, some brand new crops are being trialled this year like quinoa, oats and wheat. There is a beautiful strip of phacelia with lots of other self seeded flowers like borage, violets and poppies. The bees love it.  We have tried to do more of everything that we usually grow. We have a block of 120 sweetcorn plants. Last year they were all stolen by the badgers, just as they were about to be harvested. Better keep an eye on them this year!

We are finally eating our own potatoes again and the first courgettes and cucumbers. The strawberries have come and gone. The first gooseberries are ripe, just as we have eaten all the jams and conserves from last year. Oats on their own for breakfast for a short while only! There are lots of herbs and the garlic has been harvested and tied into plaits to hang in the kitchen. We have lots of butter at the moment as we are weaning the calf, Moon from her mothers milk. She is old enough to eat only grass now so we are getting all of Lady’s milk. All the better to make cheeses with.

Work continues on the sawmill and it will be ready for a sawing again very soon. It is vital to have it up and running as we are always in need of timber for building, fencing and repairing and of course much of our livelihood comes from selling sawn timber.

May it bee

Sorry, i couldnt help it.

So, bit of a slow news month really. At the beggining of may we were planting out lots of seedlings; squash, brocolli, cabbage. We have quite a few squash left over so we have been squeezing them in all over the place.

IMG_0616
My garden at the end of may

All the plants in my garden have shot up. From the left rhubarb, broad beans, onions, potatoes, carrots. There is a healthy row of comfrey which we use for a fertile mulch and make a stinking ‘tea’ to water plants with as it is high in nitrogen and gives plants a boost. The herb garden is looking amazing, flowering chives, rosemary and salad burnett and borage.

IMG_0607

IMG_0615

Eds polytunnel, which is mostly tomatoes with basil, coriander, parsley, chilli peppers, aubergines and capsicums.

We ate our first few broad beans the other day from plants in the polytunnel, they were amazing to have them so fresh, i haven’t eaten them in years. They popped in your mouth like fresh peas. Ohhh yeah…

Rhubarb, our dexter cow, had her calf on the 11th of may. The calf is another hiefer and is strong in healthy. We haven’t named her yet, some suggest Snowy (she is black). Please comment if you have a better suggestion! Rhubarb is not the best mum but she is getting better, when the calf was born she was headbutting her when she was trying to feed but recently i have seen her giving her an affectionate lick. Lady is an excellent mum, she was very concerned about the new calf and checked up on her when she was lying under the apple trees. Rhubarb was off stuffing her face with grass postpartum understandably!

Many of us were away during may setting up and organising a small gathering called Green Earth Awakening in the blackdown hills in Devon. A buddhafield camp with strong skills and land based workshops as well as beautiful shared live music, childrens activities, drop in crafts, shared meals, meditation. See the article on http://www.foodforafuture.wordpress.com (which i haven’t written yet on 1 june but will in the next few days)

Regarding the sawmill, we have a new bandsaw but it needs some work to install. For a start it needs to be perpendicular to the steam engine. Annoying, to put it mildly as we have spent the last five years building the new barn to house the sawmill in. We are going to build a new extension on the barn to house the engine now, but a roundwood frame for obvious reasons. There is some serious tinkering to do. But when it is all ready it should all run more smoothly than before.

To excuse the title pun, we have some bumble bee squatters. I noticed a week ago a hole where badgers had gone after the bees nest in the ground and now they have moved in with Ed and Sophia.